Thursday, June 20, 2013

Moving

WE’RE MOVING!

The Multiracial Advocacy BLOG is moving. To be more convenient to our members and those who read our blog, we are relocating on Saturday, June 22!

We will be located within our Project RACE website. Please visit us at www.projectrace.com/blog.

Be Sure to Bookmark our New Home

Sunday, June 16, 2013

Project RACE Loves Cheerios 1.0


I'm sure you have heard about the craziness around that Cheerios ad with an interracial family. My family loved it and was pretty shocked that there are still people who are so bothered by families like ours. My family is awesome! We love each other a lot. We are really close. We have so much fun together. We make each other better.  In other words, we are exactly what a family is supposed to be.

We came up with a bunch of ideas for Cheerios commercials of our own in support of General Mills and in response to the crazy people who somehow think we are different than they are. Here's one that my sister, former Project RACE Teens President Kendall Baldwin, and I shot for fun yesterday. We hope you like it and look forward to sharing some others with you soon!

- Karson

Saturday, June 15, 2013

Happy Father's Day!

Happy Father's Day to dads like Darius Rucker, featured on this week's cover of Parade <www.parade.com>. The picture below is of  Rucker with his family.

Travis Dew

Source: Parade 

Cheerios Ad Parody


A new parody on the Cheerio's commercial is showing up all over the Internet. See it here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=gwReRl4Z7EQ

Thursday, June 13, 2013

MULTIRACIAL COMMUNITY: ZERO

Census Bureau: 3 ½ Million Counted—Multiracial Community: ZERO

Most people believe that the United States Census Bureau (CB) sends them a census form every ten years, compiles the data from those forms, and their work is done. Not so fast. The CB also takes a nationwide survey every year called the American Community Survey (ACS). The results of the latest ACS were revealed yesterday.

The CB did NOT use any classification to identify the multiracial population. This is a huge blow to the multiracial community. We were assurance by the CB and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) that the classifications would remain the same as they were for the 2010 Census.

Our federal government has, once again, rendered multiracial people invisible. To say there may be an undercount of the multiracial population is a gross understatement.

Along with their actions being wrong on so many different levels, I wonder where our community is on this. Does anyone care or has the multiracial population become so apathetic toward the issue of appropriate racial and ethnic classification that it has lost its way completely? WAKE UP!

Our position at Project RACE has always stated that if the CB was going to collect population statistics at all, they needed to provide accurate data for our racial group. The CB’s American Community Survey tagline is: “A New Approach for Timely Information.” No kidding. That new approach got rid of any hope for the multiracial population.

Where are the other advocates? Eric Hamako is supposed to be representing the multiracial community on the Census Bureau’s National Advisory Committee (NAC) on Race, Ethnic, and Other Populations. Does he actually understand what happened on his watch?

Where are the academics? I know of at least one that was in an online chat room (still) taking pot shots at Project RACE and me, specifically. Another was tweeting about nothing.  At that same time, I was quickly reading about the population survey debacle and contacting the Census Bureau.

The survey figures came from 3 ½ million Americans. How could they not count the multiracial population? Does the multiracial community really not care to fix the government’s obvious discrimination and racism towards us? If that is the case, we might as well not exist at all. We are already invisible in the eyes of our federal government.   

Susan Graham








Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Multiracial Community Excluded from Population Data!

The Census Bureau embargoed its release of the American Fact Finder population estimates until tomorrow, June 13. The embargo was broken for the area of Washington DC only. From those estimates and the Census Bureau spokesperson quoted below, there is no way to include the multiracial population. In other words, they report in five major categories (White, Black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander) using "Race Alone or in Combination." If they are using some "formula" to reclassify multiracial people, we do not know what it is. We have been assured that we would be given the data on multiracial populations since the 2000 Census.

Apparently the US Census Bureau does not understand that being multiracial means that your races are all equal and no one race is considered "primary." We continue to try and educate them. More on this tomorrow as we obtain additional information. 

District grows younger and more white, census statistics show

The District is growing progressively younger and whiter, as a steep rise in the number of young white adults has outpaced the growth in African American residents, new census statistics show.

The city gained about 6,500 non-Hispanic whites in 2012, accounting for almost half the year’s total growth, and they now make up 35.5 percent of the District’s 632,000 residents.

In contrast, the city last year gained 1,700 non-Hispanic black residents, who make up 48.6 percent of the population. If the 9,300 black Hispanics who live in the city are counted, African Americans maintain the slight majority of 50.05 percent.

One in 10 residents is Hispanic, both black or white, while Asians account for less than 4 percent of the population.

The 2012 population estimates from the Census Bureau show a continuation of trends that have dramatically changed the District’s demographic characteristics over the past decade. Although African Americans remain the largest single resident group, their numbers have been on a long slide since the peak in 1970, when seven in 10 District residents were black and people proudly said they lived in “Chocolate City.”

Over a little more than a decade, the city has rebounded and reversed a population slide that began after residents started moving out to the suburbs. In the past two years, the city’s population has soared by about 30,000 people. That is 10,000 more residents than it gained in the decade preceding it.

The shift has been as much generational as racial. The bulk of the growth since 2010 has been among people between the ages of 25 and 39. That group has contributed to a baby boomlet, adding 6,000 more children younger than 5. As a result, the median age has dipped slightly, from 33.8 in 2010 to 33.6.

The figures for the District also illustrate some of the complexities of determining race in an era when one of the fastest-growing groups in the nation is people who consider themselves multiracial.

The District’s black population, for example, does not include any of the almost 16,000 residents who say they are two or more races. Ben Bolender, a demographer with the Census Bureau, said that because the census does not ask people to pick a primary identity, there’s no way to determine whether the 9,300 people who said they were both black and Hispanic think of themselves more as one than the other.

But even if all black Hispanics in the District are counted as part of the African American population, demographers agree it is probably a matter of time before they slip below the 50 percent milestone, if they haven’t already.

Source: The Washington Post Company/By  and Ted Mellnik, Updated: Wednesday, June 12, 11:03 AM

Part 2 of PR Kids Krew Series, "My Fave Multiracial Celeb!"

Time for part two! Last time Kids Krew members Alexandra and Kelly wrote about Vanessa Hudgens and Rihanna. Today you'll hear from Kids Krew member Diamond and ... ME!  lol.  -Karson





Diamond K. Benjamin
Alicia Keys was born Alicia Augello Cook on January 25, 1981. She is a singer-songwriter, record producer, and actress. Keys' mother is of Italian, Scottish, and Irish descent and her father is an African American. According to Keys, she has always been comfortable with her biracial heritage. At the age of 7 she began playing the piano and learned about such classical composers as : Beethoven, Mozart, and Chopin. Keys attended the Professional Performing Arts School at the age of 12 and began writing songs at 14. She graduated 4 years later at the age of 16 as the valedictorian. Besides winning numerous awards and selling over 30 million albums Keys is also the co-founder and Global Ambassador of Keep a Child Alive. It is a non-profit organization that provides medicine for families with HIV and AIDS in Africa. Alicia Keys is more than just an entertainer she is also someone that cares about the welfare of others. This is why she is an inspiration to me. 
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Karson Baldwin
If you follow my blog posts you won't be surprised that my favorite multiracial celebrity is Blake Griffin. To start with, he is a great dunker and has won the NBA Slam Dunk contest! He was the first pick in the NBA draft and plays for the L.A. Clippers. He's been an All Star and Rookie of the Year. He makes funny commercials especially the ones for Kia. Have you seen them? He founded Dunking for Dollars and donates $100 to fight childhood obesity for every dunk he makes. He also has a fund-raising site called Team Blake, in honor of his friend who died from Hodgkin's lymphoma.  And he has a black dad and white mom, just like me.

Census Bureau Estimates do NOT Include Multiracial Community!

The Census Bureau embargoed its release of the American Fact Finder population estimates until tomorrow, June 13. The embargo was broken for the area of Washington DC only. From those estimates and the Census Bureau spokesperson quoted below, there is no way to include the multiracial population. In other words, they report in five major categories (White, Black or African American, American Indian and Alaska Native, Asian, Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander) using "Race Alone or in Combination." If they are using some "formula" to reclassify multiracial people, we do not know what it is. We have been assured that we would be given the data on multiracial populations since the 2000 Census.

Apparently the US Census Bureau does not understand that being multiracial means that your races are all equal and no one race is considered "primary." We continue to try and educate them. More on this tomorrow as we obtain additional information. 

District grows younger and more white, census statistics show

The District is growing progressively younger and whiter, as a steep rise in the number of young white adults has outpaced the growth in African American residents, new census statistics show.

The city gained about 6,500 non-Hispanic whites in 2012, accounting for almost half the year’s total growth, and they now make up 35.5 percent of the District’s 632,000 residents.

In contrast, the city last year gained 1,700 non-Hispanic black residents, who make up 48.6 percent of the population. If the 9,300 black Hispanics who live in the city are counted, African Americans maintain the slight majority of 50.05 percent.

One in 10 residents is Hispanic, both black or white, while Asians account for less than 4 percent of the population.

The 2012 population estimates from the Census Bureau show a continuation of trends that have dramatically changed the District’s demographic characteristics over the past decade. Although African Americans remain the largest single resident group, their numbers have been on a long slide since the peak in 1970, when seven in 10 District residents were black and people proudly said they lived in “Chocolate City.”

Over a little more than a decade, the city has rebounded and reversed a population slide that began after residents started moving out to the suburbs. In the past two years, the city’s population has soared by about 30,000 people. That is 10,000 more residents than it gained in the decade preceding it.

The shift has been as much generational as racial. The bulk of the growth since 2010 has been among people between the ages of 25 and 39. That group has contributed to a baby boomlet, adding 6,000 more children younger than 5. As a result, the median age has dipped slightly, from 33.8 in 2010 to 33.6.

The figures for the District also illustrate some of the complexities of determining race in an era when one of the fastest-growing groups in the nation is people who consider themselves multiracial.

The District’s black population, for example, does not include any of the almost 16,000 residents who say they are two or more races. Ben Bolender, a demographer with the Census Bureau, said that because the census does not ask people to pick a primary identity, there’s no way to determine whether the 9,300 people who said they were both black and Hispanic think of themselves more as one than the other.

But even if all black Hispanics in the District are counted as part of the African American population, demographers agree it is probably a matter of time before they slip below the 50 percent milestone, if they haven’t already.

Source: The Washington Post Company/By  and Ted Mellnik, Updated: Wednesday, June 12, 11:03 AM

Loving Day


Happy Loving Day! 

Learn more about Loving Day at 
http://www.lovingday.org/

Sunday, June 9, 2013

Conservative vs Liberal View of Multiracial People

Conservatives More Likely than Liberals to Identify Mixed-Race Individuals as Black, NYU Study Finds


Conservatives are more likely than liberals to identify mixed-race individuals as Black, according to a series of new studies by researchers at New York University. Their findings, which appear in the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, suggest that there is a link between political ideology and racial categorization.

“A person’s race is often thought to be clear-cut and fixed,” explains Amy Krosch, a doctoral student in New York University’s Department of Psychology and the lead author of the paper. “However, our research suggests that the perception of a person as Black or White is related to one’s political views and beliefs about equality.”

The study may be downloaded here.

The paper’s other authors were: Leslie Berntsen, an NYU undergraduate at the time of the study and now a graduate student at the University of Southern California; David Amodio, an associate professor in NYU’s Department of Psychology; John Jost, a professor in NYU’s Department of Psychology; and Jay Van Bavel, an assistant professor in NYU’s Department of Psychology.

Their findings also showed a link between nationality and racial classification. The study’s U.S. subjects were more likely to identify as Black mixed-race individuals labeled as Americans than they were mixed-race individuals labeled as Canadians.

The study focused on the principle of hypodescent, which posits that multi-racial individuals are categorized according to their most socially subordinate group membership. This principle—“the one-drop rule”—was applied in the U.S. from the antebellum period through the Civil Rights Era in order to subjugate individuals with any non-White heritage by denying them full rights and liberties under the law. It was also used to send Japanese-Americans—some of whom were one-eighth Japanese—to internment camps during World War II.

In the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology study, the researchers explored the possibility of a connection between political ideology and racial categorization of unknown individuals—and, if so, what might explain this phenomenon.

To do so, they conducted three experiments, two of which included only White American subjects; a third included a racially heterogeneous panel of American subjects.

In the first experiment, White female and male subjects were shown a series of computer-generated adult male faces that morphed real-world Black and White faces at varying percentages. Subjects were instructed to categorize each of the 110 faces they saw as either “Black” or “White.” Subjects’ ideology was measured using an established seven-point, self-reported scale (1=extremely liberal to 7=extremely conservative).

Here, the results showed a link between political ideology and hypodescent: subjects who self-identified as political conservatives were more likely to identify the faces seen in the experiment as Black than were those who self-identified as liberals.

In a second experiment, the researchers explored reasons to explain this finding. Previous studies have shown that members of racial minority groups (e.g., Blacks and Asians) were just as likely as Whites to apply the principle of hypodescent in making racial judgments. This suggests that racial categorization is not simply a perspective exhibited by Whites; instead, it would appear to be more a reflection of system-justifying biases. That is, conservatives of any race may maintain traditional boundaries associated with the hierarchical social order—and, as a result, they categorize multi-racial individuals according to the most socially subordinate group membership.

The researchers repeated the experiment with a new sample, seeking to explain why conservatives are more likely to apply the principle of hypodescent. The sample of 71 subjects was overwhelmingly white (54), but was also composed of bi- or multi-racial, Asian, South Asian, Latino, and Native American subjects.

In addition to measuring political ideology in this experiment, the researchers also sought to determine if their initial findings might be the result of a system-justifying bias. To do so, they gauged the subjects’ views by administering a Social Dominance Orientation scale, which includes two factors: group-based dominance (“If certain groups stayed in their place, we would have fewer problems”) and opposition to equality (“We should do what we can to equalize conditions for groups”). This metric has been used in earlier studies to measure racial categorization.

Their results showed that, indeed, among conservatives, “opposition to equality” was a powerful predictor in the categorization of mixed-race faces as Black rather than White. However, this was not the case for “group-based dominance.” “These results suggest that conservatives may be categorizing mixed-race faces as Black to justify racial divisions that are part of the historical legacy of the social system in the United States,” the researchers wrote.

They added that while the findings in this experiment were statistically significant for its White subjects, the sample size for non-White subjects was too small to draw any meaningful conclusions.
But these results left open another question: If hypodescent among conservatives is motivated by a justification of racial divisions that are part of the United States’ legacy, then such judgments should be solely directed toward Americans. To test this, the researchers conducted another experiment in which a third set of American subjects (all White) were asked to make racial judgments of the faces they viewed. In this experiment, unlike the previous two, in some conditions the study’s subjects were told certain faces were “American” and in others they were informed faces were “Canadian.” These labels of nationality were randomized—facial images labeled as “American” to some of the study’s subjects were billed as “Canadian” to others.

Here they found self-identified conservatives were more likely than liberals to identify mixed-race “American” faces as Black than as White—a finding consistent with the other experiments. However, there was no relationship between political ideology and racial categorization for “Canadian” faces.

“It seems reasonable to conclude on the basis of these results that bias in the process of racial categorization may reflect, among other things, the motivation to defend and uphold traditional racial divisions that are part of the historical legacy of the United States,” the researchers concluded. “Conservatives exhibit stronger system justification tendencies in general and are presumably more sensitive than liberals to challenges directed at the legitimacy or stability of the social order, with its attendant degree of racial inequality.”
“Although it may be tempting to conclude political ideology leads to biases in racial categorization, the causal relationship is still open for debate,” cautioned Van Bavel.

The lead author was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship (DGE-0813964) and the research was supported by a grant from NYU’s College of Arts and Science Dean’s Undergraduate Research Fund.
Source: NYU